Dr. Scott Denny Weblog

Holistic Medicine and Acupuncture

Homeopathy for Holistic Wellness

Millions of people suffer from chronic or acute health concerns. While some are silent sufferers, others may book an appointment with their general practitioner, but more and more people are seeking relief by following some form of complementary and alternative medicine, such as homeopathy.

“Homeopathy is based on the understanding that body, mind and spirit work together in harmony when the vital force is in a state of homeostasis,” explained Dr. Vatsala Sperling, founder of Rochester Homeopathy. “When the vital force is out of tune, a whole range of physical, mental and emotional symptoms appear; collectively, these are called diseases. Homeopathy works to restore homeostasis of the vital force. The result is a deeply felt, truly holistic sense of wellness at the level of mind, body and spirit.”

Sperling grew up in India using homeopathy. She earned a doctorate degree in clinical microbiology and was awarded a Gold Medal by the president of India for her scholastic accomplishments. She was invited to join the staff of The Childs Trust Hospital in Chennai, India, as the chief of Clinical Microbiology Services, a position she held until her marriage and subsequent move to the United States in 1996.

With deep personal interest in holistic health, Sperling decided to circle back to her roots in homeopathy. She graduated from The School of Homeopathy in Devon, U.K., and founded Rochester Homeopathy last year. People from different age groups and diverse backgrounds come to her seeking help.

“In classical homeopathy, no detail is unimportant,” said Sperling, “and so, during consultation, clients are asked about every aspect of their life: health, habits, profession, hobbies, dreams and sleep, food preferences, body functions, familial and social relationships and such. These details figure into the selection of a remedy that would help restore homeostasis to the vital force. The result is a deeply felt sense of wellness.”

According to the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 38 percent of adults and 12 percent of children suffering from health concerns spend $33.9 billion annually and use some form of CAM. Homeopathy, according to the National Institute of Health, attracts people with a wide range of health concerns from wellness and prevention, to the treatment of diseases such as allergies, asthma, chronic fatigue syndrome, depression, digestive disorders, ear infections, headaches and skin rashes.

Homeopathy was introduced in late 1700s by Samuel Hahnemann, a German medical doctor. Although acute and chronic health issues can be addressed, the practice does not restrict itself to treating specific body parts or diseases labels. Instead, the whole self is the focus, with creating a healthy being—inside and out—as the emphasis.

Only after obtaining a thorough understanding of individuals’ symptoms, Sperling can recommend a remedy. “Homeopathic healing is brought about by administering a small dose of a remedy that matches the symptoms,” she said. “This remedy gently encourages the vital force to regain its normal, healthy state so that it can support good health. Following a protocol laid out by Dr. Hahnemann, remedies are made from natural substances, dissolved in water or alcohol, and taken by mouth. This system of healing is noninvasive and does not rely on expensive tests and diagnostics.

“Homeopathy is about finding the image of us in nature and matching it with a remedy,” Sperling concluded. “So anyone can benefit from this natural and complementary system of healing.”

Besides homeopathy, Sperling is a prolific writer who has published numerous research papers in clinical microbiology, several articles on homeopathy, seven children’s books based on mythology from India and co-authored the forthcoming book, “For Seven Lifetimes: An East–West Journey to a Spiritually Fulfilling and Sustainable Marriage”, with her husband, Ehud Sperling. The book, due in bookstores in February 2011, tells the story of their yearlong courtship across continents and cultures, and the success of their 15-yearlong marriage based on shared values and spiritual growth.

Contact our award winning practice today for more information on our nutritional and natural medicine approach to health!

Call for more information: 954-473-8925

Scott Denny, PhD, AP, DOM, FAAIM
Integrative Hospital Associates
2215 S. University Dr.
Davie,  FL 33324

Integrative Hospital Associates
2020 NE 48th Ct.
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33308

Websites:
http://www.drscottdenny.com/
http://www.multicareclinic.org/
http://www.naturalclinics.net/
http://www.ammamed.com

http://www.rutlandherald.com/article/20100728/FEATURES14/707289997?form_372.replyids=2&form_363.replyids=2&form_346.userid=215&form_346.replyids=7739.

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July 31, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Fish oil reduces risk of breast cancer by a third

In a new study, just published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, was conducted by a research team at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington. They investigated 35,016 postmenopausal women between the ages of 50 and 76 with no history of breast cancer who were participating in the Vitamins and Lifestyle cohort study (dubbed VITAL, short). The woman was asked to complete a 24 page questionnaire about their use of supplements other than vitamins and/or minerals.

After six years of follow-up, 880 of these women had been diagnosed with breast cancer. However, those women who reported regularly taking fish oil supplements, which contain high levels of the omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA, were found to have a 32 percent reduced risk of invasive ductal breast cancer — the most common type of breast cancer. The use of other specialty supplements, such as the herbs black cohosh and dong quai which are often taken by women to relieve symptoms of menopause, was not associated with raising or lowering breast cancer risk.

Contact our award winning practice today for more information on our nutritional and natural medicine approach to health!

Call for more information: 954-473-8925

Scott Denny, PhD, AP, DOM, FAAIM
Integrative Hospital Associates
2215 S. University Dr.
Davie,  FL 33324

Integrative Hospital Associates
2020 NE 48th Ct.
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33308

Websites:
http://www.drscottdenny.com/
http://www.multicareclinic.org/
http://www.naturalclinics.net/
http://www.ammamed.com

July 20, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Cure Your Digestive Woes with Probiotics and Fiber by Sylvia Anderson – Digestive – InsidersHealth.com

Cure Your Digestive Woes with Probiotics and Fiber by Sylvia Anderson – Digestive – InsidersHealth.com.

Suffering from digestive problems can be one of the most confusing and exhausting physical ailments you may ever experience.  Cramping, constipation and untimely trips to the bathroom can literally take away your ability to live a fully satisfied life. Luckily, scientists are continuing to find ways to use natural ingredients such as probiotics and fiber to address those problems.

Why are Digestive Problems Such a Problem?
Digestive problems might not be so bad if you could undergo a few tests to determine the exact problem, and then figure out the best way to address it.  However, it is often very difficult to tell what specifically is causing your digestive woes.  Could it be the Chinese take-out you had two nights ago, or that sandwich you ate at midnight? Could it be that you are just under a great deal of stress?  Do you have a viral infection that is turning your stomach upside down?

Your doctor can run some helpful tests, but the truth is that no one truly knows everything about what causes digestive problems and even a disorder like Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). Unfortunately, doctors often prescribe prescription or over-the-counter medications as a “blanket” approach to treatment, which may or may not address your problem. Unfortunately such medications run the risk of side effects, putting you in more misery than where you started.

To understand the digestive system, you need to know that many things can influence how well your digestive system functions. Your digestive system is made up of many chemical reactions that essentially break down your food and provide you with nourishment.  There are “good” bacteria in your stomach that help you break down this food, as well as chemicals produced by your liver that help break down fat.  If these processes are hindered then it can throw your system off track and cause you any number of problems.

Probiotics
Probiotics have been a popular option lately for addressing digestive woes. Probiotics are essentially more of the good bacteria that already reside in your digestive tract. Adding probiotics to your diet—via a food source such as yogurt, or dietary supplements—will help your digestive tract stay balanced.

Fiber
Fiber helps in a different way. Fiber is basically the indigestible strands of “threads” that are found in fruits, vegetables and whole grains.  As the food you eat travels through your digestive system, it essentially turns into liquid form. By the time that it reaches the end of its journey, the fiber in your system will help the food reform into a solid but soft stool that can be passed easily. A lack of fiber can cause both constipation and diarrhea. By getting an adequate amount of fiber in your diet each day (not too little, not too much), you can help regulate the process and hopefully avoid any added stress on your digestive system.

Don’t hesitate to ask your doctor or other healthcare provider which one of these would be the best for you (or maybe both!). Start out with a cup of yogurt per day (with added probiotics) and see how it works for you.  Likewise, fiber can be added simply by eating more fruits and vegetables, and even by consuming things like oatmeal or whole-grain toast.

Adding more fiber and probiotics are both very cost effective and simple ways to help soothe your digestive woes.  Adding one of both of these to your diet in the proper amounts—along with plenty of water—should help to get your digestive system back in balance.

Contact our award winning practice today for more information on our nutritional and natural medicine approach to health!

Call for more information: 954-473-8925

Scott Denny, PhD, AP, DOM, FAAIM
Integrative Hospital Associates
2215 S. University Dr.
Davie,  FL 33324

Integrative Hospital Associates
2020 NE 48th Ct.
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33308

Websites:
http://www.drscottdenny.com/

http://www.multicareclinic.org/

http://www.naturalclinics.net/

http://www.ammamed.com

July 6, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Acupuncture treats depression during pregnancy (without chemical drugs)

Acupuncture relives the symptoms of depression during pregnancy better than a placebo and potentially as well as pharmaceutical antidepressants, according to a study conducted by researchers from Stanford University and published in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology.

“Acupuncture that we have tested works for pregnant, depressed women,” researcher Rachel Manber said.

The researchers randomly assigned 150 pregnant women who were suffering from clinical depression to receive either massage, acupuncture designed to treat depression, or acupuncture not designed for depression. After eight weeks of treatment, 63 percent of participants in the acupuncture-for-depression group had experienced an improvement in their symptoms, compared with 44 percent of women in the other two groups.

Acupuncture is a form of traditional Chinese medicine that involves inserting needles into certain key parts of the body to treat various health conditions.

The study did not compare acupuncture to antidepressants or psychotherapy, but the success rate of acupuncture in the current study was similar to that of other therapies in studies of men and non-pregnant women, the researchers noted.

Scott Denny, PhD, AP, DOM, FAAIM

Integrative Hospital Associates
2215 S. University Dr.
Davie,  FL 33324

Integrative Hospital Associates
4711-A N. Dixie Hwy.
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33334

Websites:

http://www.drscottdenny.com

http://www.multicareclinic.org

http://www.naturalclinics.net 

For more info on this story please see: online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704454304575081753471294546.html?mod=WSJ_hpp_MIDDLENexttoWhatsNewsTop

July 6, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Alternative Methods for Quitting Smoking: Hypnosis, Acupuncture, Meditation – How to Quit Smoking

Many a successful quitter has gotten through the pangs of cigarette withdrawal using techniques such as hypnosis, acupuncture, or meditation. These alternative, or complementary, therapies address lifestyle issues not generally covered by conventional medicine—in this case, coping mentally with the little smoking triggers that lure smokers back, developing a healthy balance between the mind and the body, and relieving stress. Click on the following link for more….

Alternative Methods for Quitting Smoking: Hypnosis, Acupuncture, Meditation – How to Quit Smoking – Health.com.

Contact our award winning practice today for more information on our nutritional and natural medicine approach to health!

 

Scott Denny, PhD, AP, DOM, FAAIM

Integrative Hospital Associates
2215 S. University Dr.
Davie,  FL 33324

Integrative Hospital Associates
4711-A N. Dixie Hwy.
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33334

Websites:

http://www.drscottdenny.com

http://www.multicareclinic.org

http://www.naturalclinics.net 

April 25, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Acupuncture Could Help Period Pain, Researchers Say

Researchers said there was “promising evidence” for acupuncture in treating cramps, but that more work was needed.

In the British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, they noted two studies found little difference between real and sham acupuncture in treating pain.

Acupuncture is a less contentious form of complementary medicine than some, but its value is still disputed.

Period pain can be severe in some women and may be accompanied by nausea, diarrhoea, migraine and backache. Common treatments include pain killers, applying heat and exercise – although a recent study questioned the efficacy of the latter.

This latest review involved 27 studies – which included nearly 3,000 women. They addressed a variety of forms of acupuncture – from classical to acupoint injection.

Traditional acupuncturists insert needles in acupuncture points located along what they describe as “energy meridians” – a concept for which many scientists say there is no evidence. Sham acupuncture places needles away from these points.

It is not clear whether either form alleviates pain as a result of the placebo effect – the very ritual of undergoing acupuncture – or cause subtle changes in the nervous system and brain activity which can be beneficial.

Nice backs needles

The analysis by the team from Kyung Hee Medical Centre found that patients with severe period pain reported a greater reduction in their symptoms when using acupuncture compared with pharmacological treatments.

But they stressed there were methodological flaws in some studies, and that the findings did need to be interpreted with caution. Nevertheless, there was “promising evidence”, they wrote.

In the UK, the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (Nice) has backed the use of acupuncture in the treatment of low back pain – a move welcomed by some but criticised by those who say there is little evidence for its efficacy.

The editor-in-chief of the BJOG, Professor Philip Steer, noted that some women had period pain, also known as primary dysmenorrhoea, so badly they were “unable to function normally”.

“Women with primary dysmenorrhoea should consult their GPs or gynaecologists on the best treatment available to them. Complementary therapies should not be used exclusively, at the expense of conventional treatment, unless significant improvements have been made and your doctor tells you otherwise.”

Commentary: Despite the growing evidence the press and medical researchers will never give credit where credit is due. Statements such as, “Complementary therapies should not be used exclusively, at the expense of conventional treatment, unless significant improvements have been made and your doctor tells you otherwise,” show the continued arrogance of the medical community against of safe, effective natural therapies and the intention to have patients not be a participant in their own care. “At the expense of conventional therapies?”  What exactly are those conventional therapies? Muscle relaxants, hormones, NSAIDS. The choice is yours to make…..Dr. D.

Contact our award winning practice today for more information on our nutritional and natural medicine approach to health!

Call for more information: 954-473-8925

Scott Denny, PhD, AP, DOM, FAAIM
Integrative Hospital Associates
2215 S. University Dr.
Davie,  FL 33324

Integrative Hospital Associates
4711-A N. Dixie Hwy.
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33334

Websites:
http://www.drscottdenny.com/
http://www.multicareclinic.org/
http://www.naturalclinics.net/

Source:  http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/8518745.stm

April 25, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Study Maps Effects of Acupuncture on The Brain

ScienceDaily (2010-02-05) — New research about the effects of acupuncture on the brain may provide an understanding of the complex mechanisms of acupuncture and could lead to a wider acceptability of the treatment.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/02/100204101736.htm.

Contact our award winning practice today for more information on our nutritional and natural medicine approach to health!

Call for more information: 954-473-8925

Scott Denny, PhD, AP, DOM, FAAIM

Integrative Hospital Associates
2215 S. University Dr.
Davie,  FL 33324

Integrative Hospital Associates
4711-A N. Dixie Hwy.
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33334

Websites:

http://www.drscottdenny.com

http://www.multicareclinic.org

http://www.naturalclinics.net 

 

April 25, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Acupuncture May Ease Depression During Pregnancy

MONDAY, Feb. 22 (HealthDay News) — Women who experience depression during pregnancy may have another treatment option, new research suggests.
The study found that women treated with depression-specific acupuncture had a 63 percent response rate compared to a 44 percent response rate in women treated with control acupuncture or massage.

“We tested acupuncture as a standalone treatment, and the results are very positive,” said study author Rachel Manber, a professor at the Stanford University School of Medicine Sleep Medicine Center in Redwood City, Calif. But, she added, because this is the first study of its kind, and the acupuncture protocol used was specifically designed for this study, “you always need replication of the findings.”

Dr. Shari Lusskin, director of reproductive psychiatry at the New York University Langone Medical Center, echoed that sentiment. “It’s encouraging to see alternative treatments being studied in a scientific manner, and this study should generate further studies. It needs to be replicated on a larger scale,” she noted.

“This is one treatment, and perhaps it will become another possible treatment tool in our therapeutic toolbox,” said Lusskin. But, she cautioned that “acupuncture is not a substitute for the appropriate use of antidepressant therapy especially in women with a prior history of response to antidepressants.”

As many as 20 percent of women may experience depression during pregnancy, according to the March of Dimes. Symptoms include sad, hopeless feelings that persist, generally for more than two weeks, Lusskin said. Women may also experience severe anxiety or feel disconnected from the baby. And, she cautioned, suicidal thoughts are never normal and are a sign that you should seek help.

Many women are cautious about using medications during pregnancy, reports the study. Interpersonal psychotherapy is an option for women who are depressed during pregnancy, but this type of therapy isn’t always available, according to the study.
For the study, Manber and her colleagues recruited 150 pregnant women who were diagnosed with a major depressive disorder. All were between 12 and 30 weeks of gestation.

The women were randomly assigned to one of three groups: depression-specific acupuncture (52 women), control acupuncture (49 women) or massage (49 women). The depression-specific protocol was designed just for this study, and the control acupuncture was specifically designed to avoid using acupuncture needles in any areas known to affect depression.

The treatments lasted for eight weeks. Women received treatment twice a week for the first four weeks, and then once a week for the next four weeks. The treatments lasted an average of 25 minutes.
The researchers found a 63 percent response rate in women who received the depression-specific acupuncture, while the response rate was 44.3 percent in the control acupuncture and massage groups. A response rate was defined as a 50 percent reduction in depression symptoms, Manber said. Results of the study are scheduled to be published in the March issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

“We found our acupuncture protocol was helpful, but that does not mean that any acupuncture for depression treatment will be effective. The quality of what you get can differ from one practitioner to another,” said Manber.

“Our goal is always to find treatments that have the maximum benefits and minimum risk,” said Lusskin. “Many women think it’s safer for the baby to go off antidepressants, but there’s a real risk to the baby for untreated depression in pregnancy. And, we have enough safety data about antidepressant use in pregnancy that we can make informed choices about managing treatment during pregnancy.”

The bottom line, she said, is to talk with your doctor to find the right combination of treatments that can help you. “Depression is not a one-size-fits-all illness, and treatment won’t be one-size-fits-all either. If acupuncture ends up being helpful for you, that’s great, but make sure you’re treated into remission.”

To learn more about depression during and after pregnancy, visit the National Women’s Health Information Center.

Commentary: It is always fascinating to me that using little tiny stainless steel filaments (acupuncture needles) inserted shallowly and painlessly into the skin can have such a profound effect on the body and the mind. Although we may not entirely understand the mechanism of action it does appear that acupuncture is causing a modulation of neurochemicals in the brain and spinal cord. From an oriental medical perspective we are balancing energy or “Qi.”

I am amused at the comment that “acupuncture is not a substitute for the appropriate use of antidepressant therapy especially in women with a prior history of response to antidepressants.” Ah yes, give them more pills, and they are pregnant!

I have a practice full of patients on antidepressants who are miserable, bloated, fatigued, and more depressed because of how they feel from the medication(s).  In a recent commerical for one of these wonderful antidepressant products they bolster the “need” for the additional antidepressants by stating that it is a fact that 2/3 of patients do not have relief from taking a single antidepressant medication. TWO-THIRDS!!! In simple terms the majority of patients are not improved. This is not my claim, it is the claim of the pharmaceutical company who wants to sell their little wonder pill. I’m getting depressed just typing this stuff!

If you are looking for simple solutions for complex problems, please give me call….

Dr. D

Call for more information: 954-473-8925
Scott Denny, PhD, AP, DOM, FAAIM

Integrative Hospital Associates
2215 S. University Dr.
Davie, FL 33324

Integrative Hospital Associates
4711-A N. Dixie Hwy.
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33334

Websites:
http://www.drscottdenny.com
http://www.multicareclinic.org
http://www.naturalclinics.org

March 14, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

NIH: Vitamins and Greens May Ward Off Lung Cancer

Based on results of a recent study published in Cancer Research online, intake of multivitamins, folate and green leafy vegetables may help protect smokers from gene action that promotes lung cancer. Researchers from University of New Mexico, University of Colorado, Denver, the Lovelace Respiratory Institute and UCLA reported theirs is the first cohort-based study to identify dietary factors associated with reduced promoter methylation in cells exfoliated from the airway epithelium of smokers. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) reacted to the results, saying the three dietary factors could be protective against lung cancer in both current and former smokers.

In the trial, 1,100 participants from the Lovelace Smokers Cohort—including both current and former smokers— filled out the Harvard Food Frequency Questionnaire and provided a saliva-mucus sample, which was assessed for promoter methylation of eight genes commonly silenced in lung cancer and associated with risk for this disease. After analyzing for associations between 21 dietary variables and methylation, researchers noted significant protection against methylation relative to increased leafy green vegetables and folate intake; they also found some correlation with multivitamin intake. They concluded, “Novel interventions to prevent lung cancer should be developed based on the ability of diet and dietary supplements to affect reprogramming of the epigenome.”

Contact our award winning practice today for more information on our nutritional and natural medicine approach to health!

Call for more information: 954-473-8925

Scott Denny, PhD, AP, DOM, FAAIM

Integrative Hospital Associates
2215 S. University Dr.
Davie,  FL 33324

Integrative Hospital Associates
4711-A N. Dixie Hwy.
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33334

Websites:

http://www.drscottdenny.com

http://www.multicareclinic.org

http://www.naturalclinics.org

Source:  http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/0008-5472.CAN-09-3410v1

February 7, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Reduce Risk of Colon Cancer

HOUSTON – Long-chain omega-3 fatty acids, primarily found in fish and seafood, may have a role in colorectal cancer prevention, according to results presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research Conference, held Dec. 6-9, 2009, in Houston.

“Experimental data have shown benefits of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids in colorectal carcinogenesis, ranging from reduced tumor growth, suppression of angiogenesis and inhibition of metastasis,” said Sangmi Kim, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, N.C. “Our finding of inverse association between dietary intakes of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids and distal large bowel cancer in white participants adds additional support to the hypothesis.”

Although experimental and clinical data suggest that long-chain omega-3 fatty acids possess anti-neoplastic properties in the colon, epidemiologic data to date has been inconclusive.

Kim and colleagues studied the link between polyunsaturated fatty acid intake and distal large bowel cancer using data from a population-based control study. They recruited 1,509 white participants (716 cancer cases and 787 controls) and 369 black participants (213 cancer cases and 156 controls) using the State Cancer Registry and Division of Motor Vehicles records.

Nineteen polyunsaturated fatty acids were assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire, which included 124 questions on food items. The researchers used the questionnaire to collect information on the frequency and amount of foods typically consumed in the past 12 months.

Patients who consumed more long-chain omega-3 fatty acids had a reduced risk of distal large bowel cancer. Compared to the lowest quartile, fat intake in the highest quartile was linked with a 39 percent reduced risk of cancer.

The researchers detected these associations in white participants, but not in black participants.

“We were surprised that the association was not also observed among blacks,” Kim said. “We considered several possible explanations but were not able to account for this difference with the data we had. This finding warrants future study, but we should be careful about drawing conclusions about potential racial differences in the benefit from long-chain omega-3 fatty acids from this study.”

“An increase in dietary intake of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids, which mainly come from fish and seafood, may be beneficial in the prevention of distal large bowel cancer,” Kim said.

Commentary: And the list of health benefits of Omega-3 fatty acids continues to grow. I have been asked which product I use by several patients. I use Opti-EPA from Douglas Labs. They are enterically coated so they won’t give you indigestion. This product and others are available through my virtual dispensary. Please click here and use the access code “HEAL,” set-up an account and go shopping!

Contact our award winning practice today!

Call for more information: 954-473-8925

Scott Denny, PhD, AP, DOM, FAAIM

Integrative Hospital Associates
2215 S. University Dr.
Davie,  FL 33324

Integrative Hospital Associates
4711-A N. Dixie Hwy.
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33334

Websites:

www.drscottdenny.com
www.multicareclinic.org
www.naturalclinics.net

Source: AACR Press Release, http://www.aacr.org/home/public–media/aacr-press-releases.aspx?d=1683

February 6, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment