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Holistic Medicine and Acupuncture

Almost Half of Americans Use Alternative Medicine

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health say that nearly 40 percent of adults have used some type therapy that isn’t taught in medical schools. But more than 40 U.S. universities, including Stanford, UCLA, Duke and The George Washington University have integrative medicine centers.

With more Americans turning to alternatives, the U.S. government founded The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine as part of the National Institutes of Health.

“Our job here at the National Institutes of Health is to bring really good science to these really interesting practices,” says Dr. Josephine Briggs, the center’s director.

Practices that are considered outside mainstream medicine, like the use of dietary supplements, meditation and yoga, as well as chiropractic adjustments, acupuncture, reiki – or therapeutic touch – and massage. A survey by the NIH in 2007 indicated four in 10 Americans use one of these practices, most often to treat pain.

If nearly half the population uses so called alternative medicine, when will it be referred to as “conventional? ”

Dr. D.

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Almost Half of Americans Use Alternative Medicine | American Life | English

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August 19, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Homeopathy for Holistic Wellness

Millions of people suffer from chronic or acute health concerns. While some are silent sufferers, others may book an appointment with their general practitioner, but more and more people are seeking relief by following some form of complementary and alternative medicine, such as homeopathy.

“Homeopathy is based on the understanding that body, mind and spirit work together in harmony when the vital force is in a state of homeostasis,” explained Dr. Vatsala Sperling, founder of Rochester Homeopathy. “When the vital force is out of tune, a whole range of physical, mental and emotional symptoms appear; collectively, these are called diseases. Homeopathy works to restore homeostasis of the vital force. The result is a deeply felt, truly holistic sense of wellness at the level of mind, body and spirit.”

Sperling grew up in India using homeopathy. She earned a doctorate degree in clinical microbiology and was awarded a Gold Medal by the president of India for her scholastic accomplishments. She was invited to join the staff of The Childs Trust Hospital in Chennai, India, as the chief of Clinical Microbiology Services, a position she held until her marriage and subsequent move to the United States in 1996.

With deep personal interest in holistic health, Sperling decided to circle back to her roots in homeopathy. She graduated from The School of Homeopathy in Devon, U.K., and founded Rochester Homeopathy last year. People from different age groups and diverse backgrounds come to her seeking help.

“In classical homeopathy, no detail is unimportant,” said Sperling, “and so, during consultation, clients are asked about every aspect of their life: health, habits, profession, hobbies, dreams and sleep, food preferences, body functions, familial and social relationships and such. These details figure into the selection of a remedy that would help restore homeostasis to the vital force. The result is a deeply felt sense of wellness.”

According to the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 38 percent of adults and 12 percent of children suffering from health concerns spend $33.9 billion annually and use some form of CAM. Homeopathy, according to the National Institute of Health, attracts people with a wide range of health concerns from wellness and prevention, to the treatment of diseases such as allergies, asthma, chronic fatigue syndrome, depression, digestive disorders, ear infections, headaches and skin rashes.

Homeopathy was introduced in late 1700s by Samuel Hahnemann, a German medical doctor. Although acute and chronic health issues can be addressed, the practice does not restrict itself to treating specific body parts or diseases labels. Instead, the whole self is the focus, with creating a healthy being—inside and out—as the emphasis.

Only after obtaining a thorough understanding of individuals’ symptoms, Sperling can recommend a remedy. “Homeopathic healing is brought about by administering a small dose of a remedy that matches the symptoms,” she said. “This remedy gently encourages the vital force to regain its normal, healthy state so that it can support good health. Following a protocol laid out by Dr. Hahnemann, remedies are made from natural substances, dissolved in water or alcohol, and taken by mouth. This system of healing is noninvasive and does not rely on expensive tests and diagnostics.

“Homeopathy is about finding the image of us in nature and matching it with a remedy,” Sperling concluded. “So anyone can benefit from this natural and complementary system of healing.”

Besides homeopathy, Sperling is a prolific writer who has published numerous research papers in clinical microbiology, several articles on homeopathy, seven children’s books based on mythology from India and co-authored the forthcoming book, “For Seven Lifetimes: An East–West Journey to a Spiritually Fulfilling and Sustainable Marriage”, with her husband, Ehud Sperling. The book, due in bookstores in February 2011, tells the story of their yearlong courtship across continents and cultures, and the success of their 15-yearlong marriage based on shared values and spiritual growth.

Contact our award winning practice today for more information on our nutritional and natural medicine approach to health!

Call for more information: 954-473-8925

Scott Denny, PhD, AP, DOM, FAAIM
Integrative Hospital Associates
2215 S. University Dr.
Davie,  FL 33324

Integrative Hospital Associates
2020 NE 48th Ct.
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33308

Websites:
http://www.drscottdenny.com/
http://www.multicareclinic.org/
http://www.naturalclinics.net/
http://www.ammamed.com

http://www.rutlandherald.com/article/20100728/FEATURES14/707289997?form_372.replyids=2&form_363.replyids=2&form_346.userid=215&form_346.replyids=7739.

July 31, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Fish oil reduces risk of breast cancer by a third

In a new study, just published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, was conducted by a research team at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington. They investigated 35,016 postmenopausal women between the ages of 50 and 76 with no history of breast cancer who were participating in the Vitamins and Lifestyle cohort study (dubbed VITAL, short). The woman was asked to complete a 24 page questionnaire about their use of supplements other than vitamins and/or minerals.

After six years of follow-up, 880 of these women had been diagnosed with breast cancer. However, those women who reported regularly taking fish oil supplements, which contain high levels of the omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA, were found to have a 32 percent reduced risk of invasive ductal breast cancer — the most common type of breast cancer. The use of other specialty supplements, such as the herbs black cohosh and dong quai which are often taken by women to relieve symptoms of menopause, was not associated with raising or lowering breast cancer risk.

Contact our award winning practice today for more information on our nutritional and natural medicine approach to health!

Call for more information: 954-473-8925

Scott Denny, PhD, AP, DOM, FAAIM
Integrative Hospital Associates
2215 S. University Dr.
Davie,  FL 33324

Integrative Hospital Associates
2020 NE 48th Ct.
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33308

Websites:
http://www.drscottdenny.com/
http://www.multicareclinic.org/
http://www.naturalclinics.net/
http://www.ammamed.com

July 20, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Cure Your Digestive Woes with Probiotics and Fiber by Sylvia Anderson – Digestive – InsidersHealth.com

Cure Your Digestive Woes with Probiotics and Fiber by Sylvia Anderson – Digestive – InsidersHealth.com.

Suffering from digestive problems can be one of the most confusing and exhausting physical ailments you may ever experience.  Cramping, constipation and untimely trips to the bathroom can literally take away your ability to live a fully satisfied life. Luckily, scientists are continuing to find ways to use natural ingredients such as probiotics and fiber to address those problems.

Why are Digestive Problems Such a Problem?
Digestive problems might not be so bad if you could undergo a few tests to determine the exact problem, and then figure out the best way to address it.  However, it is often very difficult to tell what specifically is causing your digestive woes.  Could it be the Chinese take-out you had two nights ago, or that sandwich you ate at midnight? Could it be that you are just under a great deal of stress?  Do you have a viral infection that is turning your stomach upside down?

Your doctor can run some helpful tests, but the truth is that no one truly knows everything about what causes digestive problems and even a disorder like Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). Unfortunately, doctors often prescribe prescription or over-the-counter medications as a “blanket” approach to treatment, which may or may not address your problem. Unfortunately such medications run the risk of side effects, putting you in more misery than where you started.

To understand the digestive system, you need to know that many things can influence how well your digestive system functions. Your digestive system is made up of many chemical reactions that essentially break down your food and provide you with nourishment.  There are “good” bacteria in your stomach that help you break down this food, as well as chemicals produced by your liver that help break down fat.  If these processes are hindered then it can throw your system off track and cause you any number of problems.

Probiotics
Probiotics have been a popular option lately for addressing digestive woes. Probiotics are essentially more of the good bacteria that already reside in your digestive tract. Adding probiotics to your diet—via a food source such as yogurt, or dietary supplements—will help your digestive tract stay balanced.

Fiber
Fiber helps in a different way. Fiber is basically the indigestible strands of “threads” that are found in fruits, vegetables and whole grains.  As the food you eat travels through your digestive system, it essentially turns into liquid form. By the time that it reaches the end of its journey, the fiber in your system will help the food reform into a solid but soft stool that can be passed easily. A lack of fiber can cause both constipation and diarrhea. By getting an adequate amount of fiber in your diet each day (not too little, not too much), you can help regulate the process and hopefully avoid any added stress on your digestive system.

Don’t hesitate to ask your doctor or other healthcare provider which one of these would be the best for you (or maybe both!). Start out with a cup of yogurt per day (with added probiotics) and see how it works for you.  Likewise, fiber can be added simply by eating more fruits and vegetables, and even by consuming things like oatmeal or whole-grain toast.

Adding more fiber and probiotics are both very cost effective and simple ways to help soothe your digestive woes.  Adding one of both of these to your diet in the proper amounts—along with plenty of water—should help to get your digestive system back in balance.

Contact our award winning practice today for more information on our nutritional and natural medicine approach to health!

Call for more information: 954-473-8925

Scott Denny, PhD, AP, DOM, FAAIM
Integrative Hospital Associates
2215 S. University Dr.
Davie,  FL 33324

Integrative Hospital Associates
2020 NE 48th Ct.
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33308

Websites:
http://www.drscottdenny.com/

http://www.multicareclinic.org/

http://www.naturalclinics.net/

http://www.ammamed.com

July 6, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Alternative Methods for Quitting Smoking: Hypnosis, Acupuncture, Meditation – How to Quit Smoking

Many a successful quitter has gotten through the pangs of cigarette withdrawal using techniques such as hypnosis, acupuncture, or meditation. These alternative, or complementary, therapies address lifestyle issues not generally covered by conventional medicine—in this case, coping mentally with the little smoking triggers that lure smokers back, developing a healthy balance between the mind and the body, and relieving stress. Click on the following link for more….

Alternative Methods for Quitting Smoking: Hypnosis, Acupuncture, Meditation – How to Quit Smoking – Health.com.

Contact our award winning practice today for more information on our nutritional and natural medicine approach to health!

 

Scott Denny, PhD, AP, DOM, FAAIM

Integrative Hospital Associates
2215 S. University Dr.
Davie,  FL 33324

Integrative Hospital Associates
4711-A N. Dixie Hwy.
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33334

Websites:

http://www.drscottdenny.com

http://www.multicareclinic.org

http://www.naturalclinics.net 

April 25, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Omega-3 Fatty Acids May Reduce Risk of Colon Cancer

HOUSTON – Long-chain omega-3 fatty acids, primarily found in fish and seafood, may have a role in colorectal cancer prevention, according to results presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research Conference, held Dec. 6-9, 2009, in Houston.

“Experimental data have shown benefits of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids in colorectal carcinogenesis, ranging from reduced tumor growth, suppression of angiogenesis and inhibition of metastasis,” said Sangmi Kim, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, N.C. “Our finding of inverse association between dietary intakes of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids and distal large bowel cancer in white participants adds additional support to the hypothesis.”

Although experimental and clinical data suggest that long-chain omega-3 fatty acids possess anti-neoplastic properties in the colon, epidemiologic data to date has been inconclusive.

Kim and colleagues studied the link between polyunsaturated fatty acid intake and distal large bowel cancer using data from a population-based control study. They recruited 1,509 white participants (716 cancer cases and 787 controls) and 369 black participants (213 cancer cases and 156 controls) using the State Cancer Registry and Division of Motor Vehicles records.

Nineteen polyunsaturated fatty acids were assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire, which included 124 questions on food items. The researchers used the questionnaire to collect information on the frequency and amount of foods typically consumed in the past 12 months.

Patients who consumed more long-chain omega-3 fatty acids had a reduced risk of distal large bowel cancer. Compared to the lowest quartile, fat intake in the highest quartile was linked with a 39 percent reduced risk of cancer.

The researchers detected these associations in white participants, but not in black participants.

“We were surprised that the association was not also observed among blacks,” Kim said. “We considered several possible explanations but were not able to account for this difference with the data we had. This finding warrants future study, but we should be careful about drawing conclusions about potential racial differences in the benefit from long-chain omega-3 fatty acids from this study.”

“An increase in dietary intake of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids, which mainly come from fish and seafood, may be beneficial in the prevention of distal large bowel cancer,” Kim said.

Commentary: And the list of health benefits of Omega-3 fatty acids continues to grow. I have been asked which product I use by several patients. I use Opti-EPA from Douglas Labs. They are enterically coated so they won’t give you indigestion. This product and others are available through my virtual dispensary. Please click here and use the access code “HEAL,” set-up an account and go shopping!

Contact our award winning practice today!

Call for more information: 954-473-8925

Scott Denny, PhD, AP, DOM, FAAIM

Integrative Hospital Associates
2215 S. University Dr.
Davie,  FL 33324

Integrative Hospital Associates
4711-A N. Dixie Hwy.
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33334

Websites:

www.drscottdenny.com
www.multicareclinic.org
www.naturalclinics.net

Source: AACR Press Release, http://www.aacr.org/home/public–media/aacr-press-releases.aspx?d=1683

February 6, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Researchers Find the Mediterranean Diet Beats Diabetes Drugs for Controlling Blood Sugar

A first line of defense against Type 2 diabetes is diet — but which one?

In a study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, researchers assigned 215 overweight, adult residents of Naples, Italy, to adhere to one of two diets. Participants in one group were assigned to follow a Mediterranean diet — eating large quantities of fruits, vegetables, whole grains and certain healthy fats such as olive oil; favoring lean protein sources such as nuts, poultry and fish; and gaining no more than half their daily calories from carbohydrates.

Participants in the other group were assigned to follow a low-fat diet similar to that recommended by the American Heart Association — with no more than 30 percent of its daily calories from fat and 10 percent from saturated fat; low in sweets and high-fat snacks; and high in fruits, vegetables and whole grains.

The Mediterranean diet won: 56% of subjects controlled blood sugar without drugs, compared with 30% on the low-fat diet. This doesn’t mean shunning drugs. It means the right diet is key to staying well.

Source:  Time.com     

Contact our award winning practice today for more information on our nutritional and natural medicine approach to health!

Call for more information: 954-473-8925

Scott Denny, PhD, AP, DOM, FAAIM

Integrative Hospital Associates
2215 S. University Dr.
Davie,  FL 33324

Integrative Hospital Associates
4711-A N. Dixie Hwy.
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33334

Websites:

http://www.drscottdenny.com

http://www.multicareclinic.org

http://www.naturalclinics.net 

February 6, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

New approach to fighting Alzheimer’s shows potential in clinical trial

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. — In the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease, patients typically suffer a major loss of the brain connections necessary for memory and information processing. Now, a combination of nutrients that was developed at MIT has shown the potential to improve memory in Alzheimer’s patients by stimulating growth of new brain connections.

In a clinical trial of 225 Alzheimer’s patients, researchers found that a cocktail of three naturally occurring nutrients believed to promote growth of those connections, known as synapses, plus other ingredients (B vitamins, phosopholipids and antioxidants), improved verbal memory in patients with mild Alzheimer’s.

“If you can increase the number of synapses by enhancing their production, you might to some extent avoid that loss of cognitive ability,” says Richard Wurtman, the Cecil H. Green Distinguished Professor of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, who did the basic research that led to the new experimental treatment. He is an author of a paper describing the new results in the journal Alzheimer’s and Dementia.

There is currently no cure for Alzheimer’s disease, though some medications can slow the progression of the disease. In particular, many U.S. patients take cholinesterase inhibitors, which increase levels of acetylcholine, a neurotransmitter important for learning and memory.

While those treatments target the symptoms of Alzheimer’s, Wurtman hopes to attack what he believes is the root cause of the disease: loss of synapses. The three nutrients in his dietary cocktail — uridine, choline and the omega-3 fatty acid DHA (all normally present in breast milk) — are precursors to the fatty molecules that make up brain cell membranes, which form synapses.

In animal studies, Wurtman has shown that these nutrients boost the number of dendritic spines (small outcroppings of neural membranes). When those spines contact another neuron, a synapse is formed.

Three additional clinical studies in Alzheimer’s patients are now underway, one in the United States and two in Europe. Results are expected to be available between 2011 and 2013.

The first clinical study was sponsored by the French company Danone, known in the United States as Dannon; the study was conducted primarily in Europe and was led by Philip Scheltens, director of the Alzheimer Center at Vrije Universiteit Medical Center in Amsterdam. Wurtman and MIT have patented the mixture of nutrients used in the study, and Nutricia Advanced Medical Nutrition, a unit of Danone, holds the exclusive license on the patent.

Patients with mild Alzheimer’s drank the cocktail (made in the form of a nutrient drink called Souvenaid, with the collaboration of Danone) or a control beverage daily for 12 weeks. Patients who received the nutrients showed a statistically significant level of improvement compared to control subjects: 40 percent of the treated patients improved performance in a test of verbal memory (memory for words, as opposed to memory of locations or experiences) known as the Wechsler Memory Scale, while 24 percent of patients who received the control drink improved their performance. Among those who received the cocktail, patients with the mildest cases of Alzheimer’s showed the most improvement.

The drink appeared to have no effect on patients’ performance in another commonly used evaluation for Alzheimer’s patients, the ADAS-cog test. Wurtman believes that is because ADAS-cog is a more general assessment that tests for orientation and movement/spatial memory as well as cognition. So in subjects with early Alzheimer’s who show principally cognitive changes, more than the 225 subjects in the first study will probably be required to yield significant ADAS-cog changes after Souvenaid.  The 500 subjects in the ongoing study in the United States may be sufficient.

John Growdon, a neurologist at Massachusetts General Hospital, says that trying to regrow synapses is an innovative strategy and offers a complementary approach to two other lines of attack in treating Alzheimer’s: targeting the amyloid plaques that accumulate in patients’ brains, and minimizing the damage done by toxic metabolites that build up in Alzheimer’s-affected brains.

“I don’t think any one approach has a monopoly, and that’s good,” Growdon says. “You need to have a lot of different approaches because no one knows what’s going to work.”

Wurtman believes his approach to Alzheimer’s may eventually prove beneficial in treating other diseases. If these nutrients prove to be successful in Alzheimer’s patients, “then you can think about other diseases in which there are too few synapses,” such as Parkinson’s disease, he says. “There are a lot of diseases associated with synapse deficiency.”

Source: MIT http://web.mit.edu/press/2010/fighting-alzheimers.html

Contact our award winning practice today for more information on our nutritional and natural medicine approach to health!

Call for more information: 954-473-8925

Scott Denny, PhD, AP, DOM, FAAIM

Integrative Hospital Associates
2215 S. University Dr.
Davie,  FL 33324

Integrative Hospital Associates
4711-A N. Dixie Hwy.
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33334

Websites:

http://www.drscottdenny.com

http://www.multicareclinic.org

http://www.naturalclinics.net 

February 6, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Australian Women’s Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicines to Enhance Fertility: Exploring the Experiences of Women and Practitioners

Background:

Studies exploring the use of complementary and alternative medicine to enhance fertility are limited. While Australian trends indicate that women are using CAM during pregnancy, little is known about women’s use of CAM for fertility enhancement. With the rising age of women at first birth, couples are increasingly seeking assisted reproductive technologies to achieve parenthood. It is likely that CAM use for fertility enhancement will also increase, however this is not known. This paper reports on an exploratory study of women’s use of CAM for fertility enhancement.

Methods:

Three focus groups were conducted in Melbourne, Australia in 2007; two with women who used CAM to enhance their fertility and one with CAM practitioners. Participants were recruited from five metropolitan Melbourne CAM practices that specialise in women’s health. Women were asked to discuss their views and experiences of both CAM and ART, and practitioners were asked about their perceptions of why women consult them for fertility enhancement. Groups were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. The data were analyzed thematically.

Results:

Focus groups included eight CAM practitioners and seven women. Practitioners reported increasing numbers of women consulting them for fertility enhancement whilst also using ART. Women combined CAM with ART to maintain wellbeing and assist with fertility enhancement. Global themes emerging from the women’s focus groups were: women being willing to ‘try anything’ to achieve a pregnancy; women’s negative experiences of ART and a reluctance to inform their medical specialist of their CAM use; and conversely, women’s experiences with CAM being affirming and empowering.

Conclusions:

The women in our study used CAM to optimize their chances of achieving a pregnancy. Emerging themes suggest the positive relationships achieved with CAM practitioners are not always attained with orthodox medical providers. Women’s views and experiences need to be considered in the provision of fertility services, and strategies developed to enhance communication between women, medical practitioners and CAM practitioners. Further research is needed to investigate the extent of CAM use for fertility enhancement in Australia, and to explore the efficacy and safety of CAM use to enhance fertility, in isolation or with ART.

Commentary

This study confirms the growing acceptance of CAM therapies in conjunction with conventional medical approaches to pregnancy issues. It also reaffirms that CAM providers are more attentive to their patient’s concerns and the importance of the mind-body relationship. Perhaps allopathic medicine should stop discussing CAM results being influenced of by better communication, and start applying these techniques to patient care…. Just a thought…

Dr. D.

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Call for more information: 954-473-8925
Scott Denny, PhD, AP, DOM, FAAIM

Integrative Hospital Associates
2215 S. University Dr.
Davie,  FL 33324

Scott Denny, PhD, AP, DOM, FAAIM

Integrative Hospital Associates
4711-A N. Dixie Hwy.
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33334

Websites:

www.drscottdenny.com
www.naturalclinics.net

www.multicareclinic.org

Reference: BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 2009, 9:52

January 3, 2010 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Wave of Sickness and Disease Now Striking Baby Boomers AKA The Health Time Bomb

“They were the first to enjoy free health care, and had the time of their lives in the Swinging Sixties. But the post-war ‘baby boomers’ are now paying the price. Today’s 60-year-olds are the first modern generation to be less healthy than their immediate predecessors. Despite improvements in medicine and standards of living, they are more likely to be blighted. Even simple tasks such as getting in and out of bed or climbing ten steps without a rest prove a challenge. And with fast food, lack of exercise and a growing reliance on computers and other technology, the future could be even bleaker.

Researcher Teresa Seeman said: ‘The baby boomers, whatever health benefits they’ve enjoyed up until now, may not enjoy such a rosy old age.’

Professor Seeman compared the health of thousands of men and women in their 60s, 70s and 80s with data on different people of the same age collected ten years earlier.  She found that one in five of the 60-somethings polled needed help with basic day-to-day activities – up more than 50 per cent on a decade earlier. Those just over 60 are 70 per cent more likely to have difficulty walking from room to room, getting in and out of bed and eating or dressing.

Their problems did not end there. They were also 50 per cent more likely to have trouble walking a quarter of a mile or climbing ten steps without a rest. Stooping, crouching, kneeling and getting up from a chair proved 40 per cent more troublesome, the American Journal of Public Health reports. “

Please click on the following link to see an overview or our unique anti-aging protocols.

http://www.drscottdenny.com/Anti-Aging-Program.htm

From: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art…

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Call for more information: 954-473-8925
Scott Denny, PhD, AP, DOM, FAAIM
Integrative Hospital Associates
2215 S. University Dr.
Davie, FL 33324

Scott Denny, PhD, AP, DOM, FAAIM
Integrative Hospital Associates
4711 N. Dixie Hwy.
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33334

www.drscottdenny.com
www.naturalclinics.net

December 25, 2009 Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments